Our Bedtime Read–Just Read! by Lori Degman

Our Bedtime Read–Just Read! by Lori Degman

I had to write about this book right after our bedtime read tonight because it was just SO cute! Just Read!, written by Lori Degman and illustrated by Victoria Tentler-Krylov is a rhyming book that goes through all the reasons, ways, and places that you can read!

This book made my daughter realize that reading while in the grocery store was an option, made my son wish that he had a pool with aquatic animals he could read in, and made me envy this family’s car:

20190915_2041336100173229760388335.jpg
Look at all the books in that car! I’m jealous!

Just Read! could bring about some great conversations with kiddos about everything that is considered reading (the kid in the grocery store was reading a cookbook) and what could be considered missed opportunities for reading (waiting at the doctor’s office). The illustrations in this book are wonderful, and reflect a wide variety of families, kids, and ethnicities. It was a quick read, but very inspiring for those kids who have just started to be able to read independently. Even though my kids have been able to do that for quite some time, it was still a very enjoyable read for the three of us!

#KeepRaisingReaders

How the Book Julian’s A Mermaid Finally Changed My Thinking by Deana Metzke

How the Book Julian’s A Mermaid Finally Changed My Thinking by Deana Metzke

Nerdy Book Club is a great blog to learn a lot about children’s books, authors, and educator’s experiences around books. Here’s a link to something I recently wrote for the Nerdy Book Club about my experience with the book, Julian’s A Mermaid.

https://wp.me/p21t9O-4Im

They Are Never Too Old

They Are Never Too Old

My children are 8 and 10, are Harry Potter enthusiasts, have their own library cards, and enjoy reading independently. Now, for those who have read my blog before, it may seem like a random bit of information to share at the beginning of this post, but there’s a reason for it.

The other night my children and I read (and enjoyed) Owls Are Good at Keeping Secrets: An Unusual Alphabet, written by Sara O’Leary and illustrated by Jacob Grant. Yes, this is an alphabet book and my kids learned their letters a long time ago. But I saw this at the library and thought I would be interesting and grabbed it.

20190822_0658125982965058908739035.jpg

Now this may surprise you, but when we settled in for our bedtime read the other night and I pulled out this book and read the title, there were no complaints. These kids, who  when reading independently are reading books with action and/or themes of bullying and friendship drama, had no issues with listening to a book about the alphabet. Why? Because just like as adults we have our guilty pleasure books or TV shows, kids sometimes like to just relax when listening to a story. Whether its silly, funny, or even what some may find babyish, a good story is a good story. Also, its just a relaxing way to end the day, so it doesn’t have to be complicated.

So, don’t feel like you always have to read a book that is heavy in content or equal to or above their own reading level. Sometimes they just want chill and spend some quality time with their adult, even if it is a book about the alphabet.

Keep #RaisingReaders!

Read to Them by Steven Layne

Read to Them by Steven Layne

Read to them
Before the time is gone and stillness fills the room again
Read to them

What if it were meant to be that you were the one, the only one
Who could unlock the doors and share the magic with them?
What if others have been daunted by scheduling demands,
District objectives, or one hundred other obstacles?

Read to them
Be confident Charlotte has been able to teach them about friendship,
And Horton about self-worth;

Be sure the Skin Horse has been able to deliver his message.

Read to them
Let them meet Tigger, Homer Price, Aslan, and Corduroy;
Take them to Oz, Prydain, and Camazotz;

Show them a Truffula Tree.

Read to them
Laugh with them at Soup and Rob,
And cry with them when the Queen of Terabithia is forever lost;

Allow the Meeker Family to turn loyalty, injustice, and war
Into something much more than a vocabulary lesson.

What if you are the one, the only one, with the chance to do it?
What if this is the critical year for even one child?

Read to them
Before the time, before the chance is gone.

 

Steven Layne is an educator and author who renewed my passion for helping children read as a classroom teacher, which then in turn fueled my desire when I had my own children to make sure I spent time reading with them. I happened to read this poem this morning and thought it was a good reminder as to why I write this blog. We all like to think and hope that our child’s teachers are reading great books to our children, but like the poem says, sometimes that doesn’t happen, at no fault of the teacher themselves. However, as parents, although we also have some of those same issues, i.e. schedules and the like, it is easier for us to find that time to read with our children, and we know the benefits can be endless.

Just some #morningmotivation! Keep #raisingreaders!

Book Review–Enough! 20 Protesters Who Changed America

Book Review–Enough! 20 Protesters Who Changed America

I picked up this book due to the cover, because this silent protest at the Olympics is one of my favorite events in history, and the idea of reading a picture book about it was intriguing. When I read it, I discovered that it did not share the information in a way that I expected it to, but it was still informative nonetheless.

20190416_2123314134328248813617184.jpg

This book, written by Emily Easton and beautifully illustrated by Ziyue Chen, goes through protests made in America, going back as far as the Boston Tea Party and as current as Colin Kapernick. I appreciate the wide range of protests included in the book, it helps the reader see that protesting can look a lot of different ways. However, the language in the book is very simplistic, like one sentence for each protest simplistic. So while that makes for an easy read, it also (hopefully) invites lots of questions. For example, while I know what “America says, ‘Time’s Up” means, children reading the book may not.

To be fair, Easton does have some pages in the back of the book that gives more detail about each event, but a child reading this book independently may not bother with that information.

So, if you do choose to read this book with your children, just be ready to explain some of these powerful protests in more detail to make sure they get the full benefit of this picture book.