The Nighttime Adventures of Calvin and Ollie–An Illustrate Your Own Adventure Book Review

The Nighttime Adventures of Calvin and Ollie–An Illustrate Your Own Adventure Book Review

OMG–do you know kids who would love to draw their own illustrations in their favorite book? Or kids who you have to make sure they’re not using their crayons to write in their books? AKA, unbeknownst to you, the Very Hungry Caterpillar has now been colored black? If you have kids that fit into either scenario, then this may be the perfect book for them.

The Nighttime Adventures of Calvin and Ollie–An Illustrate Your Own Adventure by Krista Franks Brock is exactly what you think it is, a story that your readers would be able to illustrate themselves. This tale is about a young boy, Calvin, and his friend Ollie, a stuffed owl who has just come to life, and their nighttime trip into the forest when Calvin doesn’t want to go to sleep.

Franks Brock does a good job of easing the reader into drawing their own illustrations. The first few pages you’ll see outlines of the owl and outlines of Calvin, which will guide a hesitant illustrator into their drawings, because they will mostly be coloring. Eventually though, your reader will be able to use their imagination to make Calvin and Ollie look exactly like they want them to.

*Side note: I recommend reading it through at least once before starting the illustrations. Knowing the story will make the illustrating that much easier. Also, depending on the age of your child, they may be able to do the illustrating independently once they are familiar with the plot. (#momwin!)

Because I already struggle with letting go of my kids’ books, I already know that this is definitely one of those books that I will be keeping. Can you imagine how much joy they will get out of rereading this book in 10 years, maybe even in 5? I can just imagine the future giggles at their juvenile illustrations.

So, if you’ve got future book illustrators or artists in your household, The Nighttime Adventures of Calvin and Ollie–An Illustrate Your Own Adventure by Krista Franks Brock could be a great way to combine their skills with a love of reading!

I was given an advanced copy of the book in exchange for a review, but you can purchase this book from Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1098554345?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860

 

Keep #RaisingReaders!

Read more reviews about Calvin and Ollie here:

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Reading Traditions

Reading Traditions

As I’m writing this, it is my son’s 8th birthday, and we just finished our bedtime read. I was particular about my choice since it is a special day, and I luckily, I had just borrowed this gem from the library:

This book, by the daughter and husband of the late Amy Krouse Rosenthal, is a love letter to young boys that will help them grow into responsible, compassionate men.

One reason I love this book is because it says almost all the things I want to say, but am afraid that I won’t remember to say. People always quote the prolific advice their parents gave them, and gosh darn it, I want my children to do that too.

Another reason I’m all in with this book is because I think this is going to be a great book to start a tradition with. Since the Rosenthals have said almost everything I want to say, in order to make it stick, I think I’m gonna read it on his birthday every year. It’ll be our thing, and I will know I’ve given sound advice at least once a year.

I’ve already written about the companion book, Dear Girl, you can read about it here. Of course, my plan is to read that one to my daughter every year, so I’ll have that tradition going with each of them.

So, as you’re looking to raise readers, think about what sort of reading traditions could be appropriate for your kiddos. As for me, let’s just hope I can remember to break out the book each year.

Be Patient and Respect the Process

Be Patient and Respect the Process

I recently read a post a friend of mine shared on Facebook (not hers, but someone else’s) that basically talked about living in the moment with your children, not trying to hurry them, and as a result, hurrying life away. As usual, these things make a lot of sense, and I try to adjust my life accordingly, sometimes more successfully than others. However, this go around, within a day, I encountered a situation involving reading with my son that actually helped me put it into practice!

A short time ago we visited our local public library, and one of the books I checked out was This Book is Out of Control! by Richard Byrne. Yes, I checked out a children’s book to read myself (first), and this book was laying on my bed when my son came to chat. Since we’ve read the other books with these characters, he saw the book, opened it, and started turning the pages. Exciting, right? Initially, not so much, because he was turning the pages very quickly, like too quickly to actually be reading the words. Of course, my first reaction is to tell him, “Dude, you can read the words. How about you slow down and actually read the words so you know what the story is about?” But hey, I’m trying to resist the constant need to redirect, trying to let him have his moment, so I say nothing…

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A few moments later, after he’s turned all the pages, he goes back to the beginning of the book. Now this time, I’m still not sure if he’s reading the words, but he’s definitely going slower than he was the last time. And then, at the end he’s like, “Mom, look…” and proceeds to explain to me part of the plot!

Now, naturally I don’t honestly know what would have happened if I had interrupted his first read through, but there’s a chance I could have turned him off to the book completely. It could’ve been frustrating to the both of us, but instead, I was the only one who was frustrated, and that was only in my head, and only for a moment.

I’m sure I’ve mentioned before that patience is a virtue, especially when it comes to my son, and here’s just another example that sometimes when #RaisingReaders, you just have to let them do their own thing.

Side note: If you or your children haven’t read We’re In a Book! or This Book Just Ate My Dog!, also by Richard Byrne, I suggest you do so.

50 Wacky Things Animals Do–A Book Review

50 Wacky Things Animals Do–A Book Review

Like many kids, my children enjoy animals, both visiting them at zoos and aquariums, and reading about them. So when I came across this book, 50 Wacky Things Animals Do: Weird & Amazing Animal Facts, I knew my kids would love it…and I was right.

This book, written by Tricia Martineau Wagner and illustrated by Carles Ballesteros, is a collection of odd facts about a variety of animals. I purchased this book because it is a finalist for the Children’s Book Awards for 2018, so I knew it had a book that kids would like for sure.

Each page spread has a wacky fact and a wacky illustration to go along with it, and so far, each fact we’ve read has sparked conversation. For example, when my kids thought that a sloth moving 9 feet in a minute wasn’t that slow, we did a hilarious demonstration in our living room to show just how slow that was.

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Each page has about this much text, nice and succinct.

The book is so good that even after I stopped reading facts for the night, my daughter took the book, snuggled with her brother, and read a couple more pages. For that cuddling reason alone, we definitely recommend this book for any animal loving child that you may have in your mix.

 

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Look at this rare occurrence–sibling love! 

#RaisingReaders

#momwin