Short Stories–When You Need a Bedtime Book in a Pinch

Short Stories–When You Need a Bedtime Book in a Pinch

As a parent who works in an elementary school, I have an added bonus in being able to bring books home regularly to read to my kids for our bedtime reads. Also, we go to our public library pretty regularly, so if I can remember to grab a book (or let’s be honest, books) I usually do. However, sometimes I forget to do either. The thing is, when I don’t have a book to grab right away at bedtime, sometimes I have the urge to send them to bed without a book, which is a routine I would NOT like to start.  So, when in a pinch, and I don’t feel like reading The Book With No Pictures for the 100th time, I have found that books full of short stories are the way to go. Here are a couple of my go-tos:

imgres  We have had this book for well over a year and a half, and we just finished it last week. I initially mentioned it in my blog here, when we had just started the book. I have the ebook version of the book, which is part of the reason we didn’t finish it sooner. We would forget about it because it wasn’t sitting on one of their bookshelves. Like I mentioned in the first post, this book has a pattern to it, and my kids could both recite parts of it each time I read it. They also loved that the stories were about them–it’s written as if they had an adventure that day and I am reminding them about their experiences. Like the title says, there’s a month’s worth of stories, so its a great quick grab for kids who like silly stories.

imgresThis is another one I’ve written about before. Titled 50 Wacky Things Animals Do, this one is great for kids who enjoy nonfiction material, animals, and just weird things in general. We would read about a couple of animals a night until we finished the book. This is definitely one they wanted me to read more of each night!

 

 

Lastly, this book has been our most recent bedtime read that is full of short stories. Now, 20190130_1550416267061602993784651.jpgI’ll be honest, I’ve had this one for years, it was on clearance when I bought it, and when I looked up images of it, it looks like a lot of the copies are being sold on ebay. So, while you may not be able to get this exact book, there are other books that are full of folktales, and they will serve the same purpose.  African Folktales, retold by A. Ceni, is a book full of tales that originated on the continent of Africa. I love stories with a lesson/moral, so these short stories can spark some discussion after we read them.

 

 

So in order to not get into a #RaisingReaders rut, and even if you don’t grab any of these specific titles, I recommend that you have some sort of book full of short stories on hand that you can grab in a pinch.

Raising Readers with Hamilton

Raising Readers with Hamilton

Because of my obsession with books, as well as my superior expressive reading ;), I do most of the bedtime reading with the kids. However, I do recognize when it makes more sense for their father to have that role, and we recently had one of those moments.

My kids are obsessed with the Hamilton soundtrack. Yes, they’re a tad bit late to the party, but they’ve arrived. And it’s arrived with a whole unexpected conversation about why they can’t use curse words, but I digress…

To coincide with their desire to play the soundtrack every day, I found a book that I thought they would enjoy–

imgres-8

This book, written and illustrated by Don Brown, is all about the rivalry and eventual dual between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. Now, I was all set and ready to read this to the kids, excited even, but then a light bulb went off–why not have their Dad read it to them? My husband is a high school Social Studies teacher, and a general history buff. It would make more sense for him to read it to them, especially if they have extra questions once the story begins, because there’s a big chance I won’t be able to answer them.  And guess what? I was right!

The kids were super excited about the book, my husband enjoyed reading something to him that he already had background knowledge about, and although I love reading to the kids, I had the night off!

So, in your #RaisingReaders quest, if you’re looking to involve another reader, think about what books the reader and the kids could enjoy. Also, if you have kids that enjoy Hamilton, this is a great book for them too!

Let Your Children Lead in 2019!

Let Your Children Lead in 2019!

imgres.jpg

I just wanted to quickly wish everyone a Happy New Year, and to remember to keep raising readers, no matter where that may take you and your reader(s)!

In 2018 I gave into Harry Potter (really the fantasy genre as a whole) and developed a true appreciation for graphic novels. As a result, my kiddos continue to grow as readers and as educated citizens in general, even though that’s probably not the path I would have taken to get them there. But that’s the power in giving them choice–as long as I keep an eye on the long term goal (to enjoy books), it has been less of a headache for me and them to let them take the lead as often as I can.

So if you haven’t tried letting them take the lead, take this new year as an opportunity to let them lead the way!

 

Book Series Review– Eloise by Kay Thompson

Book Series Review– Eloise by Kay Thompson

If for some reason you are interested in trying to see if you can run out of breath during a #bedtimeread, then I highly recommend the Eloise books by Kay Thompson. Or, if you or your children like books about mischievous children (or are mischievous children themselves), then they might want to get to know Miss Eloise.

In my son’s class when they’re the Star of the Week, they can have an adult come in and read to the class. Recently, a parent came in and read Eloise, and my son could not stop talking about it and asked if I could get it from the library. I had to put it on hold, so he may not have been the only student from his class that made that request.

Although this book was written in the 1950s, I personally have never read these books. Eloise is a young child who has a nanny and basically runs havoc in the hotel that she lives in, which is the part my child naturally could not get enough of.

imgres-6.jpg

Here’s the thing, since Eloise herself is telling the story, the book reads like you would expect an active 5 year old to talk, and that’s how I ran out of breath. There’s a lot of repeated phrases, and not very many periods. Both of my children loved listening to the book, even though there were some aspects that they thought were a little strange about Eloise, including the lack of parental supervision.

Since they enjoyed that one, I decided to get some of Eloise’s other books, including Eloise at Christmastime and Eloise in Moscow.

images-1.jpg

Dad got to read the Christmastime book (yay!), and I got to read the one about Moscow. As much as we enjoyed the original book, I’ll be honest and say the Moscow one was not one we could identify with. The important thing for me to reiterate is that this book was written in 1950s, when America’s relationship with Russia was clearly not a friendly one and it is very clear in this book. Since my children don’t know anything about Russia, they didn’t really relate to any of it. Eloise had a good time of course, and continued to tell her story in her cute rambling manner, but for us, not so much.

Now from my research, it appears there’s many updated versions of Eloise’s stories, including a movie and “easy-to-read” books, none of which our family has read, but I can imagine that she’s still as rambunctious as she was in the 1950s.

Although Eloise in Moscow wasn’t a hit, we still enjoyed reading about Eloise’s adventures, even if I was out of breath when it was over.

Keep #RaisingReaders!

Boo-Boos for the Win!

Boo-Boos for the Win!

Our bedtime read a couple of evenings ago was an informational picture book and it was a hit! The Boo-Boos That Changed the World: A True Story About an Accidental Invention (Really!), written by Barry Wittgenstein and illustrated by Chris Hsu is all about the invention of the Band-Aid. I know, I know, you’ve never thought about who invented band-aids, and neither had I. However, Wittgenstein does a wonderful job telling the story, and it kept both kids and I thoroughly entertained.

First, this book has some humor to it. Even on the first page, the author leads you to believe its going to be a short story.

20180908_1908027271836061716573133.jpg
This is the first page…jokes on us.

 

Secondly, like I mentioned earlier, band-aids are one of those things that you just think have always been around. So to learn that the little individually packaged bandages did not start out that way was quite eye-opening, for both me and my kids. I did think that I was going to have to divide the book over two nights because it seemed a little long, but we breezed right through. Also, they were so into it I don’t even know where I could’ve stopped and not gotten death stares from my kids.

Sometimes there’s a risk when you choose to read an informational book as a bedtime read, not knowing whether or not your child will be into it. However, who hasn’t had a boo-boo?

If your child is at all curious about things, this may be a hit for you to help you continue #RaisingReaders!

*I received an ARC of this book thanks to Barbara Fisch of Blue Slip Media who let it go on a #BookExcursion.